The Riyadh Convention has been ratified by a number of countries that have not signed the New York Convention, such as Iraq, Libya, Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. Accordingly, in ranks where enforcement of an award may be necessary in one of these countries, there may be advantages in submitting arbitration proceedings in another Member State of the Riyadh Convention, such as VaE. It should be borne in mind, however, that the Riyadh Convention does not apply to distinctions against a government. In addition, it requires that a party seeking to obtain, in the jurisdiction where the assets are located, a certificate from a judicial authority where the arbitral award was made be certified that the arbitral award is enforceable. Without prejudice to Articles 28 and 30 of this Agreement, the decisions of arbitrators shall be recognised and enforced by each Contracting Party in the manner defined in this Part, subject to the legal standards of the requested Party, and the competent judicial authority of the requested Party may not discuss the subject matter of such arbitration proceedings or refuse enforcement of the award, except in the following cases: visits by judicial delegations and exchanges of members of the judiciary and other experts to monitor legislative and judicial developments are encouraged by the parties, as well as the exchange of views on legal problems and study visits by the personnel of each State. (b) Where the provisions of this Agreement are contrary to those of a previous special agreement, the extradition of accused or sentenced persons shall be most effective. Procedures carried out by a mutual legal assistance commission in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement shall have the same legal effect as if they were conducted before the competent authority of the requesting Party. There are two important international agreements on enforcement and distribution in the region, both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates: the 1983 Riyadh Judicial Cooperation Agreement (the “Riyadh Convention”) and the 1996 Gulf Cooperation Council Convention on the Enforcement of Judgments, Delegations and Judicial Notifications (the “GCC Convention”). The Riyadh and GCC Conventions address many of the same issues as the recognition and enforcement of civil judgments, mutual legal assistance from domestic courts to assist foreign proceedings, and the service of legal documents, including judicial proceedings. The publication or service of judicial or extrajudicial documents or documents does not allow the requested authority to pay the costs or expenses incurred. The above provisions shall not preclude one of the Contracting Parties from granting its nationals the opportunity to hear the testimonies of their nationals directly by their respective consular or diplomatic representatives in the above-mentioned cases.

In the event of a dispute concerning the nationality of the auditor, that nationality shall be determined in accordance with the law of the Contracting Party which has requested that the judicial prosecutor`s office be mandated in its territory. Where the authority requested for the publication or service of judicial and extrajudicial documents and documents is not the competent authority, it shall automatically address that request to the competent authority of its country; if it considers that this is not possible, it shall forward them to the Ministry of Justice and shall immediately inform the requesting party of its measures in both cases. . . .